Affordable Housing in Superior
Housing & Energy

Affordable Housing in Superior

Please note that BCHA withdrew its application for PD amendment from the Town of Superior’s process on September 1, 2022. Please click here to read the withdrawal letter and navigate to the Project Vision and History sections of this website to find out more.

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A Beginning

There are currently no permanently affordable rental homes or deed restricted affordable homes in the Town of Superior (the “Town”). Policy 4.2.a of the Town of Superior’s Comprehensive Plan makes it a long-term goal of the Town to “provide for a mix of attached and detached residential housing types at varied densities and price ranges to accommodate residents of all ages”. Furthermore, “a housing shortage for low-income persons and families (80% of Area Median Income) is detrimental to public health, safety, and welfare. Furthermore, the inability of residents to afford housing within the Town negatively affects the community’s jobs and housing balance and includes serious and detrimental transportation and environmental consequences.” Recognizing this, Superior’s town leaders have committed to increasing housing affordability for the community and are seeking ways to address the lack of affordable housing within Superior.

In 2018, the Town Board of Trustee’s passed a Resolution supporting the Boulder County Regional Housing Partnership’s goal to have 12% regional affordable housing stock by 2035. Total buildout in Superior by 2035 is expected to be around 6,340 housing units, so 12% of that total would be 761 affordable homes. See more at www.HomeWanted.org.

In 2020, the Town passed an Inclusionary Housing Ordinance to adopt inclusionary housing requirements in support of the Boulder County Regional Housing Partnership’s goal of ensuring that 12% of the housing inventory is designated permanently affordable to low, moderate, and middle-income households by 2035. Ordinance No. O-18 requires that new residential developments of 10 units or more are required to have 15% of the units as restricted residential units serving persons making up to 80% AMI.

Housing within the Superior Marketplace

The Town has identified Regional Transportation District’s (RTD’s) 36 & McCaslin Park-n-Ride (PnR) as a potential site for future affordable and it’s been a goal of the Town to include residential uses in the Superior Marketplace. While the original 1998 Superior Marketplace Planned Development allowed for low density residential within the Marketplace, the Town began exploring targeted infill of residential density within the Superior Marketplace. In 2016 the Town applied for a grant with the Urban Land Institute (ULI) Technical Advisory Panel (TAP) to review additional uses at the Marketplace. The ULI TAP Report recommended transit-oriented development at the Marketplace. Additionally, in 2017, the Town initiated a community engagement effort to identify issues of community-wide concern for Northwest Superior, and on outcome was community interest in a transit-oriented development at Superior Marketplace. See the Northwest Planning Project details and ULI TAP Report under the Relevant Documents section.

The Boulder County Housing Authority (BCHA) was approached by the Town of Superior in May 2021 to propose the first affordable housing development in Superior on the RTD parcel at the Superior Marketplace. This happened after the Town had received a concept plan from Element Properties for the same parcel which included exploring a public-private partnership with BCHA. At that time, the Town Board felt the Element proposal was not satisfactory and began discussions with BCHA about developing the RTD site. BCHA agrees that the RTD site is an ideal site for a permanently affordable Transit Oriented Development (TOD), where – in addition to the benefits of affordability – residents can take advantage of nearby shopping, businesses, and RTD’s regional bus system to access services and employment along the U.S. Highway 36 corridor.

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With skyrocketing housing prices within Boulder County and along the Front Range, the Boulder County Housing Authority (BCHA) is planning to create a thriving Transit Oriented Development (TOD) that will help the Town of Superior and the broader region reach important goals for addressing the community’s lack of housing affordability in the years ahead. This TOD will serve families and individuals, older adults, and our workforce, who need safe, stable, high-quality affordable homes within the Town of Superior.

BCHA proposes to amend the Superior Marketplace Planned Development (PD) to allow 100% affordable rental homes at the RTD Park-n-Ride and another parcel northwest of the PnR (known as Pad 8). These homes would serve a diverse mix of individuals and families earning up to 80% of the Area Median Income (AMI). This translates to a maximum income of $100,320 for a family of four or a maximum income of $70,240 for a single-person household, the typical income for a nurse, firefighter, or bank teller. Additionally, heat, electricity, water, trash, and recycling are all included in the rent amount, which provides significant additional savings to residents.

Colorado Housing and Finance Authority AMI table

If the PD amendment is approved, BCHA, the Town of Superior, and RTD will partner to finalize the proposed design, and would begin a robust public engagement process to shape the creation of this community through the Final Development Plan.

Map of the proposed Superior TOD housing area

To create a walkable, attractive, and enjoyable neighborhood, BCHA imagines integrating amenities such as a community space, potential non profit retail space, rooftop community gardens, and a pedestrian plaza for residents to cultivate a sense of community within the Superior Marketplace.

BCHA is the official housing authority for all areas of the county beyond the city limits of Longmont and Boulder, including Superior. A significant portion of BCHA’s mission is to maximize access to and maintain quality, environmentally-sustainable affordable housing and appropriate services for residents of Boulder County, including middle-, low-, and very-low-income community members. We accomplish this mission through community collaboration, integrated services and programs, professional organization, effective management, and the pursuit and expansion of funding sources and land and building acquisition.

In selecting a location in Superior for its next affordable housing development, Boulder County Housing Authority (BCHA) seeks to:

  • Make a meaningful contribution to the affordable housing supply and respond to the growing shortage of attainable homes in the region, thus working towards the Boulder County Regional Housing Partnership’s (BCRHP’s) regional goal of securing 12% of the housing inventory as permanently affordable to low- and middle-income households by 2035.
  • Alleviate the stress of housing insecurity that many members of our community are experiencing, focusing on homes for rent to households below 60% of the Area Median Income (AMI).
  • Create a well connected neighborhood, where residents can live, work, shop, and play, with a range of transportation options and less dependence on cars.
  • Align with the Town of Superior’s sustainability goals, including increasing the efficiency of homes by reducing energy intensity of buildings and reducing cost to heat homes, using electric only Energy Star rated appliances, installing photovoltaic (PV) panels to offset energy use, using sustainable materials and recycling materials in the construction process, providing recycling and composting (if available) to residents, and ensuring availability of various transportation options to reduce reliance on cars and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.
  • Support the region’s economic vitality by ensuring that the current workforce is able to remain in the community while creating opportunities for workers, who are currently forced to commute, to live near their jobs.
  • Create a thriving and successful affordable neighborhood that connects residents to the surrounding community in downtown Superior and Louisville, and to regional areas such as Boulder and Denver.

A Transit-oriented development (TOD) creates walkable communities for people of all ages, abilities, and incomes while providing more transportation and housing choices to the community. Furthermore, TODS are more environmentally and economically sustainable. As demand for housing increases, the desire for a transit-connected, convenient, and walkable community has emerged. Demographics have also changed over time with more single person households, households headed by single parents, and seniors. These demographic groups that are increasing in size are the same demographic groups that have historically shown a preference for higher density housing near transit. These are also the demographics that have a high need for affordable housing within Boulder County.

TODs have many benefits…

For the community a TOD can help lower household transportation costs and reduce the dependence on vehicles, boost public transit ridership, reduce greenhouse gas emissions and air pollution, improve physical health, and make housing more affordable by reducing developer expenditures on parking and allowing higher-density zoning.

For the Town a TOD can spur economic development, keep local workforce in the community, help meet sustainability goals, increase revenue for local businesses, increase revenue from sales taxes, increase housing supply, bring much needed funding to the community, and make more efficient use of limited land resources.

Research shows that nationally, transportation is second only to housing as a household cost, with the average family spending approximately 32% of their income on housing and 19% on transportation. More importantly, extremely low-income households can spend over 50% of their family income on transportation and often depend on unreliable automobiles. Many lower-income families move to suburban locations because of lower housing costs, but any gains they make are quickly erased or exceeded by increased transportation costs. However, for families who live in transit rich locations, 32% remains the cost of housing, but transportation can be as low as 9%. Realizing the Potential: Expanding Housing Opportunities Near Transit, The Center for Transit Oriented Development, pp. 7-10.

For more information about the benefits of TODs, check out the Technical Documents, Policies & Research section.

Transit agencies, like the Regional Transit District (RTD), and cities may enter into joint development with other public or private development partners on publicly owned land to develop housing that supports transit ridership, meets public goals including affordability and the revitalization of neighborhoods. As an experienced affordable housing developer, the Boulder County Housing Authority (BCHA) brings their experience, resources, and mission to this potential project, which will result in more successful development for the community.

What about this location makes it an ideal TOD?

This location at the McCaslin Park-n-Ride connects potential residents to RTD’s regional bus system to access services along the U.S. Highway 36 corridor from Boulder to Denver. In addition to the bus service, BCHA envisions working with RTD to develop a multi-modal transit hub that offers a car share program, Electric Vehicle (EV) car charging stations, bike share program, e-bike charging stations, a bike maintenance station, and bike storage for both residents and transit riders. To support and encourage alternate transit options, BCHA provides its residents with a Neighborhood EcoPass. This location is also within walking and biking distance to local businesses, grocery stores, parks, trails, and Downtown Superior. BCHA envisions improving pedestrian and bike access around the site and throughout the Marketplace, connecting the neighborhood to surrounding communities such as Old Town Superior, the newly created Downtown Superior, and neighboring Louisville.

The McCaslin Park-n-Ride is owned and operated by the Regional Transit District (RTD) and BCHA will need RTD’s approval to develop the property. As part of the pre-development process and in addition to the Town of Superior’s entitlement and rezoning processes, BCHA will need to apply to RTD under their Unsolicited Proposal Procedure for Real Property to jointly develop the property.

Affordable Housing in Superior - Concurrent RTD Process

Depending on the outcomes of either process, BCHA may review other locations for development that fit the needs of the Town of Superior.

On December 30, 2021, the Marshall Fire devastated the Town of Superior and the City of Louisville, destroying and damaging over 1,000 homes and businesses. It is unknown at this time how the aftermath of the fire will alter the Town’s priorities for development at the different locations. What we do know is the need for safe, stable, and affordable homes is more necessary than ever. BCHA is committed to supporting the Town of Superior as it plans for the future and to providing a significant number of high quality, environmentally sustainable, permanently affordable homes for the community.

If you have been impacted by the Marshall Fire and need assistance, or know someone who has, please navigate to the resources:

Note that BCHA is waiving income restrictions on its properties for individuals and families displaced by the Marshall fire. For more information, please read this document, and contact Valerie Edmonds or

Danielle Davidson at 720-564-2267, LeasingMarshallFire@bouldercounty.org:

BCHA needs to obtain approval through both RTD’s pre-development process as well as the Town of Superior’s planning process. The entire process, having started in 2021, will likely take three to four years to complete before any future construction could begin. In addition to the planning approval and planning processes, BCHA needs to obtain funding for the project, which will likely come from multiple sources.

Focusing on a potential development at the McCaslin PnR, BCHA submitted their application to the Town of Superior in January 2022, to amend the Superior Marketplace Planned Development (PD) to include residential uses on the RTD PnR. In the August 2022, BCHA resubmitted the PD Amendment Application to include the Pad 8 parcel. However, after conducting initial community engagement on the project – through coffee hours, virtual office hours, and email communications – BCHA withdrew its application on September 1, 2022, to allow for more time for discussions with elected and appointed officials, Town staff, stakeholders and residents.

Town of Superior Process RTD Process Community Engagement Opportunities
January 22, 2018 Board of Trustees Resolution No. R-10 supports the goals of the Boulder County Regional Housing Partnership’s Regional Housing Strategy
October 12, 2020 Board of Trustees Resolution No. O-18 adopts
Inclusionary Housing requirements
February 23, 2021 RTD adopts Resolution No. 0002
Equitable Transit-Oriented Development Policy
May 24, 2021 BCHA discusses possible opportunities for affordable housing,
including the Superior Marketplace RTD site at Board of Trustees meeting
August 9, 2021 BCHA discusses affordable housing at Superior Marketplace RTD site at Board of Trustees meeting
November 16, 2021 RTD Step 2
Technical Review Application submitted
January 17, 2022 BCHA submits PD Amendment Application **
August 19, 2022 BCHA submits revised PD Amendment Documentation Coffee Meet Ups &
Ongoing Virtual Office Hours
September 1, 2022 BCHA formally withdraws PD Amendment Application
September 26, 2022 BCHA presentation at Board of Trustees meeting
Q1/Q2 2023 New PD Amendment Application** On-Going Engagement Opportunities:

  • Coffee and/or office hours (within and outside normal business hours)
  • Process Committee Formation
  • Process Committee Implementation
  • Advisory Committee Planning
  • Placemaking Activity with Artists, Kids, Families (Details TBD)
  • And Many More Fun Opportunities
Q2 2023 RTD Step 3
Unsolicited Proposal Submittal
Q3 2023 RTD Step 4
Alternate Proposals
Q4 2023 RTD Step 5
Impact Analysis & Review
Q4 2023 RTD Step 6
Committee and Board Review
Q4 2023 PD Amendment Application** to Update
Architectural Design Guidelines
Q4 2023 Final Development Plan Application
Q1 2024 RTD Step 7
Exclusive Negotiation Period
Q2 2024 RTD Step 8
Review of Business Terms
Q3 2024 Building Permit Application
2025 Construction

* This approval applies to the PD Amendment and Rezoning to add residential uses to the RTD PnR and Pad 8 parcels of the Planned Development of Superior Marketplace only. This would not approve any specific project design.

Please note: Due to COVID-19, some meetings may be held virtually or in a hybrid format. Please visit the Town of Superior’s web site for Planning Commission and Town Board public hearing documents (agendas and meeting minutes) and schedule details.

As shown on the timeline above, the Superior Marketplace PD amendment is the first step necessary to launch the first affordable housing project for the Town of Superior. Following this step, BCHA would go through the RTD unsolicited application process and the Town of Superior planning process. These would include robust community engagement to determine design details for this project. For more history on this site, please visit the Community Engagement section.

The Boulder County Housing Authority has partnered with a team of expert consultants to bring Superior’s first affordable housing site to life:

Architect

Affordable Housing in Superior - Project Team - Architect

Transportation Consultant

Affordable Housing in Superior - Project Team - Transportation Consultant

Civil Engineering

Affordable Housing in Superior - Project Team - Civil Engineering

Community Engagement

Affordable Housing in Superior - Project Team - Community Engagement

Survey

Affordable Housing in Superior - Project Team - Survey

The Boulder County Housing Authority is committed to transparency and an inclusive public process. Project related documents, submissions, and materials are available below.

Project Submittal Documents (with Town of Superior)

BCHA Documents

Community Engagement Documents

  • Flyer: Affordable Housing in Superior | A Starting Place
  • Presentation: Affordable Housing in Superior | A Starting Place
  • Project Description

RTD Documents

Policy & Research Documents

Community Engagement

Creating a thriving neighborhood of affordable homes requires a solid understanding of the community’s needs and interests, as well as the technical characteristics of the site. BCHA takes a wholistic approach to community outreach and engagement, exceeding the required process by the Town’s regulations. The public engagement process for this project will incorporate three phases of engagement: Regional, Community, and Neighbors.

Community engagement process for BCHA’s Superior TOD affordable housing proposal

This approach to engagement creates an inclusive, transparent planning process that values specific neighborhood feedback about housing, density, transportation, design, and concerns that the surrounding community may have. BCHA welcomes this engagement because when we work together, we create a community that people want to be a part of and celebrate. You are encouraged to share your perspective, ideas for potential uses of the development site, creative solutions, and priorities with the project team.

Through the planning process, BCHA is committed to:

  • Continuing to engage with neighbors and others with an interest in this community of affordable homes in a productive conversation around how to meet the community’s broader needs around diverse housing, environmental sustainability, mobility, connectivity, and more.
  • Engaging with a broad spectrum of community members and stakeholders to gather feedback, inform, and collaborate toward design solutions.
  • Working with the public sector entities including the Town of Superior, the City of Louisville, RTD, and others who may be interested in the area, to develop housing solutions that align with the 2017 Regional Housing Plan’s goals.

Tentative High-Level Timeline: Affordable Housing in Superior

At this stage of the project, the team will seek approval to add 100% affordable mixed-use residential uses to the property through a PD Amendment. The team is available throughout this phase to meet with the community.

More specifically, the following events were organized and facilitated by the project team to date:

  • Tuesday, July 26, 2022, 8:30-10am: Coffee hour at Serendipity Tap & Café, Superior Community Center
  • Thursday, August 4, 2022, 8:30-10am: Coffee hour at Serendipity Tap & Café, Superior Community Center
  • Thursday, August 11, 2022, 8:30-10am: Coffee hour at Serendipity Tap & Café,
  • Weekly on Thursdays, 3-4pm, from Thursday, July 28, 2022 through September 15, 2022: Virtual office hour with team members on Zoom

Approximately 20-25 people participated in these various events to learn about the project, provide feedback on the public outreach plan and schedule and share their comments, concerns, and questions. Below is a summary of what we’ve heard:

  • General support for affordable housing in Superior
  • A desire for reduced height to maintain views
  • Concern about additional density in the area
  • Support for affordable housing next to transit
  • Concerns about the timing of this project with respect to the Marshall Fire recovery
  • Desire for activated public spaces
  • Concerns about traffic and impacts to surrounding neighborhoods
  • Concerns about this project enabling additional residential development within the Superior Marketplace

In response to questions posed through this engagement and to address incoming questions and concerns, we will keep adding new questions to the Frequently Asked Questions section of this website (see below).

Additional Engagement Opportunities

Even though the PD amendment application was withdrawn on September 1, 2022, active engagement of the community, stakeholders, and Town staff or elected officials will continue. Please stay tuned and sign up to find out more about future opportunities to meet the project team and provide your feedback, including the formation of a community-based advisory group.

For questions or comments about this project, please email SuperiorTOD@bouldercounty.org

Frequently Asked Questions

The answers in this Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) section have been compiled by the Boulder County Housing Authority. The answers represent the best information we have at this time.

Project Location & Timing

Home is where you can be yourself, rest, and re-energize. In today’s increasingly hectic world, this is essential to good health. If we want a healthy community, all those who live, work, raise families, and age in Boulder County must have access to a safe, stable, affordable home. Living in a safe, stable, and affordable home makes a person healthier because it reduces stress and allows the community member to spend money on other important things.

In Boulder County, a home for a family of three earning 50% of the Area Median Income ($52,650) is considered affordable if it costs $297,000 or less, which puts most of these families well out of range for buying a home today. Likewise, the family would have a hard time renting even a two-bedroom home for $1,278. There are thousands of families, seniors, and other individuals in Boulder County facing this challenge.

There currently is no affordable housing development in the Town of Superior. BCHA is excited about the opportunity to bring the first one to completion and contribute to the Boulder County Regional Housing Partnership’s goal of adding 12,000 affordable homes by 2035.

The need for affordable housing in Boulder County – including the Superior area – has been tremendous for some time, and only intensifies with each passing year. There are increasing numbers of people working in the service industry in Superior who are paying well over a third (many over half) of their income every month to have a home that is not a long drive away. This is the reality now for more and more workers and families in Boulder County. High housing costs are pushing people out of the community, many permanently. Recognizing this, Superior’s town leaders have also committed to increasing housing affordability for the community and are seeking ways to address this now. In 2018, the Town Board of Trustee’s passed Resolution No. R-10 (Series 2018) supporting the Boulder County Regional Housing Partnership’s goal to have 12% regional affordable housing stock by 2035. Total buildout in Superior by 2035 is expected to be around 6,340 housing units, so 12% of that total would be 761 affordable homes.

BCHA has been looking for opportunities to build affordable housing in Superior for well over a decade. BCHA was approached by the Town of Superior in May 2021 to propose the first affordable housing development in Superior on the RTD parcel at the Superior Marketplace. This happened after the Town had received a concept plan from Element Properties for the same parcel which included exploring a public-private partnership with BCHA. At that time, the Town Board felt the Element proposal was not satisfactory and began discussions with BCHA about developing the RTD site. BCHA agrees that the RTD site is an ideal site for a permanently affordable Transit Oriented Development (TOD). In addition, opportunities for transit-oriented affordable housing are also few and far between and becoming scarcer as land prices continue to rise across the region. This opportunity is unique: the RTD site is in a community that very much needs affordable housing, next to major transit opportunities, and near businesses that employ people.

We are confident it won’t. We fully understand the need to focus on Marshall Fire recovery in the Superior community, and we are committed to supporting that effort by working to provide affordable housing for the town while not siphoning resources during a critical time. Our proposal for a PD Amendment requires minimal time or resource commitment from the Town of Superior. Following the PD Amendment, there would be a relatively long period of time (about a year) during which most of the administrative work would continue to be on BCHA and our partners, not on the Town of Superior.

Not at all. The Boulder County Housing Authority is part of Boulder County Housing and Human Services, an organization that has been collaborating with many other partners to help respond to the Marshall Fire’s devastation through connecting community members with over $9 million in financial assistance and other services, such as food, mental health supports, and other basic needs. We understand the urgency of the community’s desire to recover, and our organization will continue to be part of the effort. We have also been seeking to increase the number of affordable homes in the Superior community for years, even as the need has escalated, and this RTD site opportunity is a unique one. Our proposal would not need a notable level of Town of Superior resources for some time, so recovery work would continue as it has without disruption.

BCHA was approached by the Town of Superior in May 2021 to propose the first affordable housing development in Superior on the RTD parcel at the Superior Marketplace. This happened after the Town had received a concept plan from Element Properties for the same parcel which included exploring a public-private partnership with BCHA. At that time, the Town Board felt the Element proposal was not satisfactory and began discussions with BCHA about developing the RTD site. The Town asked BCHA to look into developing the site itself given its experience and expertise in affordable housing.

No, it’s not. BCHA has been looking at the possibility of creating transit-oriented affordable housing in this area since well before Brixmor’s project came forward, and our request for an added use on the RTD site and Lot 8 is fully independent from Brixmor’s proposal. We are excited to be able to move forward with a proposal that could – after many years of thought – bring affordable housing to an area of Superior that is right next to bus rapid transit that will help residents get back and forth to Denver, DIA, Boulder, and beyond.

The Town of Superior has an Inclusionary Housing ordinance that requires all residential builders to ensure at least 15% of the homes in a new development are affordable. These requirements are considered independently from any other developments that may be proposed at the same time. Each residential developer is responsible for meeting the town’s Inclusionary Housing ordinance on their own.

Housing

“Affordable” housing means a home that costs less than one-third of a household’s gross monthly income. To set a mortgage or rent at an affordable rate and keep it that way, a home’s deed must often be restricted. This is usually what affordable housing builders provide for both rentals and ownership.

With BCHA, the level of affordability is set by guidelines from the federal and state government, as well as requirements by lenders, investors, and funding sources for certain levels of annual income. These levels can range from 20% to 120% Area Median Income (AMI), and are set by HUD and provided by Colorado Housing and Finance Authority (CHFA). BCHA targets most of its homes at the 30% – 60% AMI range.

Affordable housing generally targets the 20% to 60% Area Median Income (AMI) range, where workforce housing may target 60% – 120% AMI.

The homes will be for rent.

There are two types of “Section 8 housing.” The first is where federal funds are used to build and subsidize operations of an affordable housing building. The affordable housing community in Superior will not be traditional federally subsidized housing.

The second type of Section 8 is also known as “Housing Choice Vouchers.” This is a HUD program that enables a household to pay 30% of their income on rent, and HUD provides a subsidy for the remainder. Housing Choice Vouchers can be used wherever there is a willing landlord and a unit that meets the HUD requirements (reasonable rent, and a Housing Quality Standards inspection). The new community of affordable housing will accept Housing Choice Vouchers.

Housing Choice Vouchers are a powerful tool to assist very-­low-income households and create income diversity in a neighborhood. However, the resource is extremely scarce: waitlist times are often 5-­10 years.

We anticipate that a small percentage of residents who will live in this affordable housing project may qualify for income-based federal housing assistance under the Housing Choice Voucher program. This housing does not depend upon HUD or the Housing Choice Voucher for funding.

BCHA will own and manage the property.

The proposed housing will likely be apartment style homes. The final building types and height will be determined through the planning process with extensive opportunity for input from the community.

Design Elements

Architecture and design will be developed throughout our inclusive planning process. Through a variety of community outreach events we will gain input on design elements and incorporate these into our site planning and building design. We also anticipate integrating community amenities such as a pocket park space, community gathering spaces, and trail connectivity.

BCHA has selected Coburn as its architect for this project.

There are a variety of strategies and design features that can be incorporated to make this neighborhood very pedestrian-friendly. Strategies to slow traffic and encourage safe pedestrian access can include narrow street sections, speed bumps where pedestrian crossings exist, having pedestrian crossings at full-stop intersections, necking down the street section at pedestrian crossings, having pedestrian crossing signage, and more. The design team will incorporate these features, as applicable, into the final design in order to create a safe, pedestrian-friendly environment for both the potential residents and the larger community.

We do not have exact numbers yet, but similar BCHA properties provide some parking for residents. A parking and traffic study will be conducted in the coming months.

Yes, BCHA will consider solar photovoltaic (PV) panels in the design and construction of the project.

The height of whatever is built there would be driven by what the site can accommodate to help meet affordable housing needs and guided by input from Town of Superior representatives and community members. We want to build enough affordable homes to serve a community that needs them; that is our goal. At this time, we believe a building up to four stories above existing grade would allow us to construct enough affordable housing on the site to help meet the needs of the community.

Development Construction

  • What is the timeline for construction?

The design, approval, and financing of affordable housing is a multi-step process that can be difficult to predict. Based on the current project status, the fastest that the project could proceed is outlined below:

  • Site planning and City entitlements: 2021 – 2023
  • RTD Unsolicited Proposal process: 2023 – 2024
  • Apply for affordable housing funding: 2023
  • Begin construction on the first phase of affordable homes: 2025

Development Construction

The design, approval, and financing of affordable housing is a multi-step process that can be difficult to predict. Based on the current project status, the fastest that the project could proceed is outlined below:

  • Site planning and City entitlements: 2021 – 2022
  • Apply for affordable housing funding: 2022 – 2023
  • Begin construction on the first phase of affordable homes: 2024
  • Complete the first phase of affordable homes: 2025

BCHA will work closely with the Town of Superior and the adjoining neighbors to create safe, low impact access to the site. The general contractor, once one is selected, will be required to create a detailed and specific construction access plan, and will ensure that all subcontractors and materials providers adhere to that plan.

Other ways to minimize impacts include setting limits on work hours, setting specific limited construction access routes, putting restrictions on where employees and subcontractors can park, and having a water truck on site to minimize dust. A perimeter fence will also be constructed around the entire project site to isolate the dangers of an active constructive site from the general public. All of these approaches have been utilized on previous projects.

Yes. The willingness and ability to recruit local subcontractors will be one of the selection criteria used to screen the general contractor.

Community Impacts – Marketplace and RTD Park-n-Ride

Housing diversity contributes to economic activity associated with households spending their disposable income on items such as food, clothing, transportation, and health care. The degree to which these impacts remain in the local economy depends on the services and goods available within that particular region. Community revitalization, expanding home ownership, and the effective delivery of healthcare and other services are all enhanced by public investment in stable affordable housing. From the standpoint of a healthy lifestyle, when housing is made more affordable, then the income that is saved can be used to meet other basic needs; for example, the purchase of fresh fruits, vegetables and other healthy foods.

Research has demonstrated that inclusion of more diverse and affordable housing for families and individuals, elders, and members of the workforce in communities increases spending and employment in the local economy, and reduces the risks of foreclosures and the instability in the economy when employers have difficulty attracting and retaining workers.

From the National Association of Realtors: “Nationwide, most studies indicate that affordable housing has no long term negative impact on surrounding home values.” There is research indicating that property values adjacent to affordable housing developments have increased, including at Josephine Commons in Lafayette. We have not seen a decline in property values in neighborhoods adjacent to a BCHA affordable housing project.

No. No local tax increases are planned because of this housing project or added workloads for Town employees. Boulder County Housing Authority will be responsible for securing the funds to build and maintain the housing.

Traffic, Access, Utilities

An initial traffic study was completed as part of the PD Amendment Application. Please navigate to the Project Documents section to read this study.

Once the project is further along in the design phase and the number of housing units is estimated, further traffic and parking studies will be completed. The study will take into account current traffic patterns, future growth in Superior, as well as traffic generated by the project.

This study will create a projection of the traffic generated by the proposed units, the capacity for the local roads to serve these trips, and the impacts to Level of Service (LOS) associated with the development. Any traffic improvements required by the proposed units, including signals, stop signs, acceleration / deceleration lanes, turn lanes, etc. would be included in the development costs and paid for by the developer and/or the Town of Superior.

As part of our initial PD Amendment Application, the Town of Superior asked us to conduct a traffic study that included consideration of both proposals. This is because the developments would be adjacent to each other and the two would interact in terms of traffic flows and impacts. BCHA’s latest traffic study is independent of Brixmor’s project.

Future Residents

Per the guidance received, there must be a substantial and legitimate justification for applying preferences. Based on the information provided, there is concern that the live/residency preference could result in a disparate impact on a protected class. Please see the guidance outlined in the Local Preference Policies Under the Fair Housing Act for reference.

Boulder County Housing Authority (BHCA) will manage the eligibility for the rental housing. Applicants will be required to provide income documentation, as well as pass both criminal and sex offender background checks.

Yes. For more information on Housing Choice Vouchers:

Rent amounts vary by home size (number of bedrooms) and the Gross Household Income. As the project develops, rent amounts will be posted based on the latest Income Limit and Maximum Rent Tables from Colorado Housing and Finance Authority (CHFA).

The project will likely serve households with income at or below 60-80% of Area Median Income (AMI). The HUD-established income limits which will apply to applicants will change from now until project completion. The income limits listed in the chart below reflect the latest numbers we havefrom 2022 – and are likely to change as the project develops.

Source: Colorado Housing and Finance Authority (CHFA)

Boulder County Housing Authority (BHCA) has a full property management and maintenance team responsible for the day-to-day operations of its housing. Maintenance staff conduct regular inspections, attend to work orders, and are available for emergencies 24/7.

Yes. As long as you were income-qualified at the time of application and lease-up you will not be asked to move if your income increases.

The total current value of all applicable assets such as checking, savings, and money market accounts, IRA’s, certificates of deposit, real estate, annuities, trust accounts, term life insurance, and more, will be calculated together.

Project Team and Financing

The Boulder County Housing Authority (BCHA) is the official housing authority for all areas of the county beyond the city limits of Longmont and Boulder, including Superior. BCHA was formed to serve the unmet housing needs of Boulder County residents in 1975. BCHA owns and manages over 900 affordable homes across Boulder County. BCHA is committed to owning and managing our properties in perpetuity.

We need the expertise of professionals who design sites like this to help inform our PD Amendment Application, and to be ready to answer questions from the community about the range of options that will be available. The goal is to ensure that – while providing adequate additions to the affordable housing stock – the new development complements, fits into, and enhances the Superior community. Following the PD Amendment, design of the site would begin to be informed by community members through an intensive engagement process that the architectural firm and other partners would help lead.

Boulder County Housing Authority (BHCA) has completed several similar projects over the past six years: Josephine Commons (senior housing) and Aspinwall (middle-­ and low-­income affordable rental housing) in Lafayette, Kestrel (senior and multifamily affordable rental housing) in Louisville, Tungsten Village (multifamily affordable rental housing) in Nederland, and The Spoke on Coffman (multifamily affordable rental housing) in Longmont. These communities have many amenities including a commercial kitchen with a senior meals program, a common house with a community center and classroom space, communal green space, playgrounds, community gardens, and connections to open space and trails.

For a map and photos of other BCHA’s projects, please navigate to the Project Documents section to view the document named “Presentation: Affordable Housing in Superior | A Starting Place (English)”.

Community Outreach and Engagement

Each affordable housing development process will have a unique and locally designed community engagement process that is designed to best meet the needs of the community and the project schedule. Affordable housing funders and local planning regulations strongly encourage public outreach as part of the process. Boulder County Housing Authority (BHCA) is committed to being responsive to the local context and community needs each time we purchase or build affordable housing. BCHA builds an in-depth community engagement for all of our projects. We have found conducting community meetings, open houses, focus groups, meeting with established local groups, hosting or attending workshops, publishing newsletters, keeping interest lists, and having a web presence to be productive approaches to community engagement.

Please navigate to the Community Engagement section of this website to find out more about specific strategies for this project.

  • If you would be interested in living in transit-oriented affordable housing in Superior, please sign up here to receive information.
  • You can also sign up here if you want to receive information but would not be interested in living in transit-oriented affordable housing in Superior.
  • Attend our community meetings and updates.

You can always visit this website and/or submit questions to Danica Powell at danica@trestlestrategy.com.

Our community engagement began in earnest in July because BCHA, Boulder County Commissioners, and the Town of Superior only recently settled on this site as the best available option for transit-oriented affordable housing. We have been and are working to provide ample opportunities for engagement within the community. For more information on the project and to stay tuned and sign up to find out about future engagement opportunities, please visit BCHA’s project page at boco.org/SuperiorTODHousing and sign up to receive updates about the project.

As we have demonstrated in Lafayette, Louisville, and other communities, BCHA and our partners have a long track record of community engagement that goes above and beyond what is generally required in housing development, and we are committed to ensuring community members have ample opportunity to provide input around design, ask questions and get answers, and know what is happening as things move forward.

  • Sign up here if you only want information updates about this potential new community in Superior (and would not be interested in living in it).
  • Attend our community and outreach events.

You can always visit this website and/or submit questions to the project team at SuperiorTOD@bouldercounty.org.

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